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Resident Escorts Heritage/History Readers to His 1950s-60s Yesteryear

Submitted byadmin onSun, 01/27/2019 - 12:10

Jay "Terry" Prater, an avid fan of the Johnson City History/Heritage page, has been in the ministry for over 50 years. He has pastored churches in several states, along with East Park and Oakland Avenue Baptist churches  in Johnson City. He recently shared some photos from his early years in Johnson City.

Different Views of Old Johnson City from a Poem and a Stereograph

Submitted byadmin onSun, 01/27/2019 - 12:10

I recently uncovered two interesting articles from my yesteryear collection. Tom Hodge, a former Johnson City Press writer, penned the first one in April 1987. It contained an unidentified, undated poem sent to the columnist by Rena Helvey, providing a less-than-complimentary but interesting lyrical reflection of the old city:

Popular Rural Magazine, The Progressive Farmer, Lobbied for Painted Farmhouses in 1911

Submitted byadmin onSun, 01/27/2019 - 12:10

In 1911, The Progressive Farmer, a popular rural oriented monthly magazine, started a crusade to promote the painting of southern farmhouses. The publication noted that painting a house added greatly to its beauty and attractiveness of the entire farm on which it was situated. In addition, there could be no doubt that it created a subtle psychological effect in bringing the residents to a more cheerful frame of mind.

Can You Name the Year When All 19 East Tennessee Newspaper Items Below Occurred?

Submitted byadmin onSun, 01/27/2019 - 12:10

Today's column is a quiz to see if you can identify in which year all of the 19 items below appeared in the Johnson City Press-Chronicle newspaper. The answer is revealed in the last paragraph.  I will narrow the choices to 1951, 1956, 1961, 1966, 1971 and 1976. Read on and take a trip down East Tennessee's memory lane:

Uncle Nick, a Hermit, Found Serenity in His Iron Mountain Shack

Submitted byadmin onSun, 01/27/2019 - 12:10

John Thompson recently wrote an article for the Press concerning Nicholas ("Nick, the Hermit") Grindstaff (1851-1923), a celebrated legend of yesteryear who spent most of his adult life in solitude on 4,000-foot Iron Mountain in Johnson County. My aunt, Doris Cox Anderson, reminded me that Nick was her husband Dana's great uncle. He shared added facts about his kin.