Pioneers

Gifted Stage Actor Once Played Continuous Role of Davy Crockett, Late 1800s

Submitted by admin on Sun, 01/27/2019 - 12:10

In my unvarying search for Northeast Tennessee history, I often uncover attention-grabbing material. Recently, I spotted something from the late 1800s that aroused my curiosity because it pertained to Davy Crockett, a favorite theme of mine. It concerned an actor from Kentucky who became rich and famous for his on-stage portrayal of the noted hunter and storyteller.

Henry Johnson's Grandson Recalls His Famous City Founder Grandfather

Submitted by admin on Sun, 01/27/2019 - 12:10

East Tennessee State University's Archives of Appalachia is a gold mine of area history. Case in point is a newspaper clipping from the Lester Moore Collection containing a reprint of an undated Johnson City Chronicle article written by John Smalling, a grandson of city founder, Henry Johnson (1809-1874).

Henry Johnson's Grandson Recalls His Famous City Founder Grandfather

Submitted by admin on Sun, 01/27/2019 - 12:10

The East Tennessee State University's Archives of Appalachia is a gold mine of area history. Case in point is a newspaper clipping from the Lester Moore Collection containing a reprint of an undated Johnson City Chronicle article written by John Smalling, a grandson of city founder, Henry Johnson (1809-1874).

The Real King of the Wild Frontier: Davy Crockett or Sam Houston?

Submitted by admin on Sun, 01/27/2019 - 12:10

One of my favorite writers, the late Hal Boyle, former Associated Press writer, questioned in a July 1955 column if Davy Crockett was really “King of the Wild Frontier.” “Davy Crockett, king of the wild frontier?” he wrote. “Why, man, there are people here in Davy's old home state who’ll tell you he was nothing but a wet-eared boy in an oversized coonskin cap compared to Sam Houston. 

The Last Days of Tennessee Soldier, Statesman, John Sevier

Submitted by admin on Sun, 01/27/2019 - 12:10

John Sevier (1745-1815) is recognized as our state's great pioneer and statesman. He was so popular that, after his first term as governor of Tennessee, the people reelected him to that office as long as the law would permit. Although the limit was six years, after being out of office for two years, he was chosen for three more terms of two years each, giving him a total of 12 years service as governor. 

Darling Jones' “Sweetlips” Turned the Tide of the American Revolution

Submitted by admin on Sun, 01/27/2019 - 12:10

(Note: The subject of this article is controversal and will likely be rewritten to address some response that came in after it appeared in the Johnson City Press. Some people maintain that it is accurate as written, while others believe it was Robert Young who owned Sweetlips and brought down the British leader Patrick Ferguson at the Revolutionary War Battle of King's Mountain. Check back later for updates and comments. If you have information on this subject and would like to post a blog at the end of the article, e-mail me at boblcox@bcyesteyear.com.)