Entertainment

How the City's Carnival Queen in Sept. 1900 Was Chosen

Submitted by admin on Sun, 01/27/2019 - 12:10

In the fall of 1900, a local newspaper noted that in some countries, a few girls were born to wear crowns, but in America all of them were born queens, but only a relatively few were selected to wear crowns. Johnson City had her quota of uncrowned queens and was called upon to select one to wear the ornamental head covering during the Carnival that had come to town. 

Rubin and Cherry Carnival Came to Johnson City in April, 1917

Submitted by admin on Sun, 01/27/2019 - 12:10

In the past, I wrote about several carnivals and circuses that came to Northeast Tennessee. They included the Mighty Haag Railroad Shows, Gentry Brothers, Hagenbeck-Wallace Circus, The Great New York and New Orleans Zoological and Equestrian Exposition, John Robinson's Circus and J.J. Page Carnival. The latter wintered in Johnson City along Love Street.

In 1904, Gov. Bob Taylor Made a Memorable Visit to the John Robinson Circus in Elizabethton

Submitted by admin on Sun, 01/27/2019 - 12:10

Governor "Our Bob" Taylor often commented about the John Robinson Circus that he occasionally visited. It was the first one that he ever witnessed, never forgetting the lingering memories of it. Bob speculated that he would always remain young as long as this circus would fill his memories of those special days long passed by. He was convinced that it was the best tonic old men could ingest.

Vintage Television Comedians Who Once Tickled Our Funny Bone

Submitted by admin on Sun, 01/27/2019 - 12:10

The recent passing of W. Hanes Lancaster, Jr. evoked my recollections and fondness of early television comedians whom I eagerly looked forward to watching every week. The following is an brief exercise to see how many of the funnymen listed below you can match with their corresponding descriptors. If you do well on it, you are likely on Social Security. 

The Edisonia, Criterion, State Theatres Once Occupied 236 E. Main Street

Submitted by admin on Sun, 01/27/2019 - 12:10

It is enjoyable to explore the genealogy of old buildings in downtown Johnson City. In particular, one edifice at 236 E. Main had a long and varied subsistence. Many of us associate several businesses with that location: Wallace Shoe Store (1970-72), Jo-Ann's Shops (1950s-60s), Christiansen's Cafe (late 1940s) and Dinty Moore Cafe (early 1940s).