Grocery Stores (Mom and Pop and Large Ones) Were PlentifulAround Johnson City in the 1940s-1960s

Submitted by bobcox on Wed, 02/13/2019 - 20:50

In the mid 1940s, my mother ordered groceries from Ford Wilson Grocery Store located on 200 Elm Street, which was several blocks away from where we lived in the Gardner Apartments, located at the intersection of W. Watauga Avenue and W. Market Street.

Two Area Lakes Figured into My Early Years: Hungry Mother State Park and Cox's Lake

Submitted by admin on Sun, 01/27/2019 - 12:10

A Virginia legend states that when Native Americans destroyed several settlements on the New River, south of what became known as Hungry Mother Park, Molly Marley and her small child were among the survivors taken to the raiders' base north of the park. Upon finding help, the only words the child could utter were "Hungry Mother," indicating a strong craving for food.

A significant highlight of the late 1940's was for my family to embark on a short excursion to a local state park, Hungry Mother State Park, located in Smyth County is just above the Virginia line near Marion, Virginia.

The park, which gets its name from the Hungry Mother Creek that feeds the lake, is situated on a 108-acre lake with a manmade beach. What makes it so pretty is the gorgeous view of the mountains surrounding the lake.

The Life and Death of Tennessee's Own Admiral David Glasco Farragut

Submitted by admin on Sun, 01/27/2019 - 12:10

With the death of Admiral Farragut, which took place at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, on Aug. 15, 1870, after a protracted illness, the country lost the officer who stood at the head of the Navy, not only in official rank but in universal estimation of merit based upon the severest tests most gloriously sustained.

1940 Elizabethton Storm Claimed Lives, Damaged Property

Submitted by admin on Sun, 01/27/2019 - 12:10

On August 14, 1940, a devastating flood occurred in Elizabethton, brought about by a massive overflow of the mountain-fed Watauga River. The 24-hour torrential rain was the remnant of a 91-mph hurricane that, after pounding the South Carolina and Georgia coasts, took direct aim at East Tennessee. The Watauga, normally a peaceful mountain stream about 50 feet wide and only a few feet deep, rose to a staggering 26 to 30 feet and a quarter of a mile wide.